Robbie Morrison

Germany

My work involves modeling national energy systems to support public policy development. I use open source and open data methods exclusively. Improving public engagement and developing trust are two key reasons for adopting open techniques in this domain.

Stories started by Robbie Morrison

Recent Contributions from Robbie Morrison

04 April 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Data misuse whistleblower gives evidence to UK parliament‎; 21:19:44, 04 Apr 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> The Guardian reports on 4 April 2018 that an official facebook blog puts the number of users whose personal data was abused as "up to 87 million people". https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2018/apr/04/facebook-cambridge-analytica-user-data-latest-more-than-thought )

03 April 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Ingrid Strauch‎; 19:26:47, 03 Apr 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Hi Ingrid / thanks for the Christopher Wylie video link / unfortunately I haven't got time at the moment to watch it and pick out the interesting bits / Robbie )

28 March 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Data misuse whistleblower gives evidence to UK parliament‎; 11:59:34, 28 Mar 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> I watched much of the live-stream of Wylie's evidence. Is there an archive or transcript somewhere that we can refer to? Some points from memory: He said that the number of compromised facebook users was substantially higher that 50 million. So that should be fixed. A quote in the current article has a word missing, surely: "I was not there so I CANNOT speak to the veracity of it." )

23 March 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Feedback on everything please!‎; 10:44:35, 23 Mar 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> In which case, articles should have an assigned status (and thinking aloud here): work-in-progress released frozen. The concept of freezing stories might be useful? In the sense of accepting only corrections. Which leads to the notion of versioning stories. So, like Wikipedia, readers can refer to an earlier incarnation using a dedicated URL. Indeed I look forward to the day WikiTribune abandons WordPress and commissions its own platform software. )
• (view) . . Comment: Feedback on everything please!‎; 10:33:26, 23 Mar 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Useful to not that all European Commission funded scientific research will be open access from 2020. Moreover the Commission wants to build its own publications platform to support this process (European Commission 2017). While not related to academic publishing, it might be of interest that some news sites use the "weak paywall" model, for instance, the New York Times (Dourado 2012). WikiTribune editors should therefore be aware that a google search might reveal a non-paywalled URL whereas a direct visit to the site requires registration and payment. REFERENCES European Commission (21 December 2017). Towards a Horizon 2020 platform for open access — Information note. Brussels, Belgium: European Commission. https://ec.europa.eu/research/openscience/pdf/information_note_platform_public.pdf Dourado, Eli (29 November 2012). "Chapter 6: The Times, they are a-changing: the new economics of weak copyright enforcement". In Brito, Jerry, Tom W Bell, Eli Dourado, Timothy B Lee, Christina Mulligan, David G Post, Patrick Ruffini, and Reihan Salam. Copyright unbalanced: from incentive to excess. Arlington, Virginia, USA: Mercatus Center, George Mason University. pp 95–107. ISBN 978-098360775-5. )
• (view) . . Comment: Feedback on everything please!‎; 10:09:49, 23 Mar 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Any chance of an IBAN (international bank account number) so those of us in Europe (and selected countries in Africa and South America) without a visa card or paypal account can donate? https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Bank_Account_Number#Adoption )

21 March 2018

• (view) . . Comment: GDPR: European Union forces pace on protection of individual data on the internet‎; 14:02:29, 21 Mar 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Just be aware that it is a little inaccurate to say that individuals will own their personal data under the GDPR. The GDPR is based on human rights and not property rights considerations. In contrast, copyright, which protects creative works by humans, is, along with patents and trademarks, one of the big three intellectual property rights. HTH. Robbie )
13:57:15, 21 Mar 2018 ( diff | hist). . European Union forces pace on protection of individual data on the internet (Updated → added "in the case of personal data" because qualification is needed)
13:54:08, 21 Mar 2018 ( diff | hist). . European Union forces pace on protection of individual data on the internet (Updated → minor copy-edit / "million" should be downcased)
13:53:02, 21 Mar 2018 ( diff | hist). . European Union forces pace on protection of individual data on the internet (Updated → changed to exabytes as "quintillion" is ambiguous and rare)

13 February 2018

12 February 2018

• (view) . . Comment: What Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, JP Morgan tell us about the US healthcare system‎; 12:52:50, 12 Feb 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Done. )

11 February 2018

08 February 2018

12:18:34, 08 Feb 2018 ( diff | hist). . Open Science (Updated → added bullet point on "open licensing")
12:15:00, 08 Feb 2018 ( diff | hist). . Open Science (Updated → smalll copy-edit)

07 February 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Assange and Snowden in exile while Pentagon Papers leaker in 'The Post' movie‎; 17:37:37, 07 Feb 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Just to note that I changed "presidents" to "precedence" and then reverted that change. I read the source interview and Snowden had been discussing the action of US presidents. Wrong call on my part. Sorry. Robbie )
• (view) . . Comment: Feedback on everything please!‎; 16:52:27, 07 Feb 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Hello Kaj. Interesting project. Just briefly. I don't mind if the forum postings are ordered chronologically (Discourse) or on user likes (Talkyard, stackoverflow). Perhaps the display mode should be a user preference (not difficult to implement?). But what I do think is that the service should run on WT hardware, whether hosted or actual. Moreover the server location should be carefully chosen on legal grounds, because there are considerable differences between nation jurisdictions: copyright, deformation, data protection, the right to free speech, media law, and state surveillance (particularly in relation to source protection). And WT should use not use proprietary software for a whole stack of reasons I won't traverse here. On that last note, I suggest WT shift to a self-hosted open alternative to slack for real-time discussions (a slack session is scheduled for this weekend). On a practical level, the Linux client for slack is both beta and under a proprietary license, so that rules me out as a participant. More generally I think the WT commitment to "open" has to be across the board. With best wishes, Robbie )

06 February 2018

03 February 2018

02 February 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Has renewable energy hit a threshold for 'abrupt and irreversible change?'‎; 13:36:55, 02 Feb 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Hello Hubert. Electrical storage is indeed expensive and mostly indicated for smoothing diurnal variations in systems with high shares of photovoltaics. So the contested per kWh figure is for storage capacity and not generation. You mention Tesla. Their recently installed Li-ion 100 MW (instantaneous) battery bank in South Australia is an interesting development but no longer contemporary news. In that case, the installation unexpectedly provided a sub-second response to a distant coal plant outage. There are now all manner of solid state solutions that ameliorate the effects of renewable energy intermittency (notwithstanding that the example given involved a failure with conventional technology). Thanks for drafting the original story. Robbie REFERENCES D'Aprile, Paolo, John Newman, and Dickon Pinner (August 2016). The new economics of energy storage. McKinsey & Company. https://www.mckinsey.com/business-functions/sustainability-and-resource-productivity/our-insights/the-new-economics-of-energy-storage )
• (view) . . Comment: Has renewable energy hit a threshold for 'abrupt and irreversible change?'‎; 11:38:36, 02 Feb 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Hello Alan. You raise excellent points. I am sure the originating author will be happy to have your feedback. I carefully checked the paragraph you queried against the source, namely IRENA (2016). The key information is given in the executive summary (pages 10-19) and in particular table ES-1 (page 10). First, the figure of 25% is incorrect, it should be 26% and applies to onshore wind. Second, the phrasing in the article is clumsy and should better read "That report further estimated that the generation costs of electricity from onshore wind and solar could decline by 26% to 59% respectively over the next decade to 2025". I will make that edit shortly. The costs quoted are the average levelized cost of electricity production (LCOE) in 2015 US dollars. This is explained in the report. But the quote in the article from McKinsey is neither referenced nor present in IRENA (2016). It should be removed if nobody can cite the source. I'll do that in a week if no clarification is forthcoming. Regarding the figure of "$200 per kilowatt-hour", I suspect MWh is the correct unit. Again, we can check this against the actual report once we have the details. Regarding your general question of the conditions that should apply when determining LCOE's, I believe that technology-specific LCOE's under "average" conditions are of limited value and that detailed integrated system models are vastly more preferable for both private planning and public policy development (disclosure: I work with these kind of models). I personally prefer page numbers be given when quoting specific information. Perhaps this, together with academic style referencing, should become the norm on WT. If so, this will need markup support from the platform (WT techs should note this as being a feature request). REFERENCES IRENA (June 2016). The power to change: solar and wind cost reduction potential to 2025. Bonn, Germany: International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA). ISBN 978-92-95111-97-4. http://www.irena.org/DocumentDownloads/Publications/IRENA_Power_to_Change_2016.pdf )

01 February 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Has renewable energy hit a threshold for 'abrupt and irreversible change?'‎; 13:22:39, 01 Feb 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> I like the title. I've even seen Ottmar Edenhofer, Germany attempt an analysis along these lines using phase plots, attractors, and chaos theory. Tipping points are a legitimate concept in this context. )
• (view) . . Comment: Has renewable energy hit a threshold for 'abrupt and irreversible change?'‎; 13:19:02, 01 Feb 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Hello Hubert. Very nicely written. And from my understanding, completely correct, both in detail and trend. Kemfert et al (2017) offers a model-based perspective which also backs up the theme of the article. But model projections probably belong to another story. Kemfert, Claudia, Thorsten Burandt, Karlo Hainsch, Konstantin Löffler, Pao-Yu Oei, and Christian von Hirschhausen (November 2017). "Nuclear power unnecessary for climate protection—there are more cost-efficient alternatives" DIW Economic Bulletin. (48.2017): 498–508. ISSN 2192-7219. https://www.econstor.eu/bitstream/10419/172948/1/1009290517.pdf )

31 January 2018

• (view) . . Comment: May talks up UK as home of AI: warns tech sector it risks regulation‎; 14:00:32, 31 Jan 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> With reference to the AI thread, it is not easy it analyze this kind of political rhetoric. But public interest AI needs open data. And my reading is that the European Commission policy on open data is light years ahead of that of the United Kingdom. On 19 January 2018, I attended a EC public hearing on, among other things, privately held information of public interest. Very inspiring work by the Commission. Contrast that with the recent BA/RS publication (see below) which represents a tiny step towards data governance in the UK. I wonder if this story should be forked to explore the UK government statements on AI leadership, vis-a-vis real development within the European Union. The British Academy and the Royal Society (June 2017). Data management and use: governance in the 21st century. London, United Kingdom: The British Academy and the Royal Society. https://royalsociety.org/~/media/policy/projects/data-governance/data-management-governance.pdf PS: any chance of markup within these talk dialogs, raw text is rather limiting? )

22 January 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Angela Long‎; 11:59:17, 22 Jan 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Hello Angela. A note to say thanks for subbing the story I started on the Elsevier "Projekt DEAL" boycott. Much appreciated and nice to be backed up by experienced journalism. I have another story in the pipeline, namely that the German nuclear phaseout did not, in contrast to widely held belief, lead to an increase in carbon emissions. But I have to wait until the underpinning report is published. With best wishes, Robbie. )

16 January 2018

05:46:05, 16 Jan 2018 ( diff | hist). . Scholars seek open access in academic journal deal (Updated → correcting references sort order)

15 January 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Q&A: Michael Wolff stands by 'writerly' take on Trump's 'irregular' White House‎; 08:41:40, 15 Jan 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> The opening bullet point is not clear to me: "Wolff says book has all he could stand up to his satisfaction". Is 'stand up' some kind of journo slang? Perhaps a rephrase? )

12 January 2018

• (view) . . Comment: Scholars seek open access in academic journal deal‎; 06:13:50, 12 Jan 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> One problem, Achi, is the high cost of open access under the current model. Just yesterday I bought out an Elsevier paywall from my own pocket for €2700. So I know the sums involved. Download from doi:10.1016/j.esr.2017.12.010 in a couple of weeks and enjoy. Robbie. )
• (view) . . Comment: Scholars seek open access in academic journal deal‎; 06:12:40, 12 Jan 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> For transparency, here is the raw quote from Tim Gowers, send Mon, 8 Jan 2018 14:59:21 +0100 "The developments in Germany are showing, finally, that academic institutions can negotiate from a position of strength. Personally, I hope that the current impasse will last indefinitely, so that other countries will see that scientists can manage without expensive Big Deals, and publishers will be forced to adopt much less exploitative business models." )
06:06:49, 12 Jan 2018 ( diff | hist). . Scholars seek open access in academic journal deal (Updated → added sentence on no response from Elsevier)
• (view) . . Comment: Feedback on everything please!‎; 06:00:13, 12 Jan 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Will the official app be developed as an open source project? Or do you wish to keep the communication protocols hidden? On that note, why not open up a wide-ranging public web API set (as twitter does) and allow third parties to write their own apps? While noting that twitter is considerably more interactive than WT. )
• (view) . . Comment: Feedback on everything please!‎; 05:53:47, 12 Jan 2018 . . Robbie Morrison (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Thanks. Still I worry that the Talk pages will become clogged with the kind of comment, much of it off-topic and more that mildly abusive, that the online trad media websites attract. A legal question. I guess the Talk pages are under a CC BY-SA 3.0 license too. I read the Terms and Conditions section 7 on the Licensing of Content. It talks about "when you submit text". Perhaps it should be made clear that this covers Talk pages, if indeed it does, as well as articles. In addition, the license in use should be noted at the bottom of *every page* and not be buried in the Terms and Conditions under paragraph 7(a)(1). It is also good practice (and quite possibly a legal requirement) to at least link to a full copy of said license in the Terms and Conditions. )

11 January 2018

15:26:32, 11 Jan 2018 ( diff | hist). . Is phosphorus running out and why does it matter? (Updated → "supersede" is the wrong word here)

10 January 2018

13:49:56, 10 Jan 2018 ( diff | hist). . Is phosphorus running out and why does it matter? (Updated → removed misplaced 'strong' tags)

History for user "Robbie Morrison"

Select two items to compare revisions

06 January 2018

19:08:39, 06 Jan 2018 . .‎ Robbie Morrison (Updated → updated)

03 January 2018

18:03:33, 03 Jan 2018 . .‎ Robbie Morrison (Updated → updated)
18:02:02, 03 Jan 2018 . .‎ Robbie Morrison (Updated → updated)
16:57:19, 03 Jan 2018 . .‎ Robbie Morrison (Updated → updated)
16:51:52, 03 Jan 2018 . .‎ Robbie Morrison (Updated → updated)
16:47:51, 03 Jan 2018 . .‎ Robbie Morrison (Updated → updated)

Talk to this user

  1. Hey Robbie – I’ve removed your talk post which contained your personal phone number for privacy reasons. I advise against posting things like that in the strongest terms. You never know what people will do with your information online!

    If I could re-instate your comment with a fake phone number, I would like to do so. Could you please let me know one way or another?

    – your friendly community manager

    1. Hello Fiona. Thanks. That was a mistake. Though I am not personally concerned that my listed phone number is on a publicly accessible talk page.

      But please reinstate the comment with a fake or x-ed out phone number. With best wishes, Robbie

  2. I am currently seeking additional quotations from other open access commentators. I will also contact Elsevier once the story is live and I can send their PR department a URL.

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