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    Thanks Nick. I don’t find the ability to edit stories to be intuitive in terms of where I add new and relevant information for a draft article. I think that WikiTribune needs to provide better instructions.

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    DU
    Deleted User

    fred, stop adding comments to the references and footnotes section. You don’t seem to know what footnotes and references are. Learn to use the “talk” section for commenting on posts.

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    Thanks Chuck, I am OK with your edit since the substance of my point still remains – sea level rise will continue regardless of the cause and man needs to adapt.

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    Hi Harry. The map showing Florida 100,000 years ago comes from a study by scientists George Maul and Douglas Martin in 1993. There is also a natural history museaum in Fort Lauderdale Florida that shows a different but similar map . Here is the link to Maul and Martin study:
    https://agupubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1029/93GL02371
    It is not in dispute that glaciers melding/receding is the main reason why oceans have been rising. This receding has been slow enough to give humans and animals sufficient time to adapt.

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      Hi Fred and Harry: I saw your addition about Florida sea levels as “pending” this morning and went in and did a copyedit and some changes. Fred, as the text you included was really too long for a “highlight” (those tend to be single sentences), I moved all your copy to a new “Florida” section further down in the story. I hope that is OK with you. Also, and before I’d seen this Talk thread, I looked around for a source confirming that Florida was twice its size 100,000 years ago. What I found, and what I linked to, was a site from Library & Archives of Florida that says Florida was twice its present size in 12,000 B.C. I sent that edit through. But you may disagree and want to amend my edit. I am happy for you to do so. Or maybe you’ll agree my edit adds some clarity. If not, I’m happy to keep talking and changing until we are all happy what we have is correct. Thanks, Chuck

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    Hi Harry. Here is a graphic illustration of how the size of Florida has changed over the last 100,000 years due to the natural rising of the world’s sea levels due to the receding glaciers from the impact of the sun vs Earth (and to a minor extent due to AGW).

    http://www.keyshistory.org/3%20Geological%20Floridas.jpg

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      Hi Fred. Thanks. Could you please link me to where the graphic comes from? (the document or website). And could you please link me to the information/graphic showing how populations will move due to sea level rise over the next 100,000 years? (the document or website).

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    Hi Fed. I see you submitted a revision on this piece – https://www.wikitribune.com/story/2018/06/11/climate-change/places-most-likely-to-be-affected-by-sea-level-rise/73495/

    Could you please link me to where you got the information for this? – “Fact: 100,000 years ago the state of Florida in the USA was more than twice the size it is today. Over the last 100,000 years the sea level has been steadily rising and the inhabitants of Florida moved inland. This same type of shift in population will continue around the world as the sea level rises over the next 100,000 years.”

    I’m not an expert, but I should imagine that sea level rise over the last 100,000 years has been largely natural driven, as opposed to by humans, and that while broadly speaking sea levels will continue to rise for centuries, possibly even millennia, I doubt anyone can predict with any confidence what will happen to sea levels over the next 100,000 years.

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