Technology |Emerging

Amazon patents wristband that monitors and directs workers’ hands

Talk (7)

Linh Nguyen

Linh Nguyen

"Hello there. I will add a statement i..."
WJ

Wild Jerry

"One piece of missing information is w..."
AH

Alan Henness

"Ha! So it does."
Linh Nguyen

Linh Nguyen

"Well observed Dan :)"

This is an emerging story which needs expansion. If you wish you may EDIT to add information or discuss it in TALK.

Amazon has patented designs for a bracelet (GeekWire) that would monitor workers’ hand movements and use vibrations – known as “haptic feedback” – to point them in the right direction if they put their hands on the wrong places. The concept is meant to streamline and fulfil more orders, but has also raised concerns over extra surveillance in the work environment. 

One patent’s description reads that the approach would remove existing time-consuming acts, “such as pushing a button associated with the inventory bin or scanning a barcode associated with the inventory bin.”

The patent for the ultrasonic wristband was filed in 2016 by Jonathan Cohn, a senior technical program manager for Amazon Go, the checkout-less store which recently opened in Seattle.

In a statement to technology site The Verge, an Amazon spokesperson said that the speculation that it times the toilet breaks of employees is “misguided.”

“This idea, if implemented in the future, would improve the process for our fulfillment associates. By moving equipment to associates’ wrists, we could free up their hands from scanners and their eyes from computer screens,” said the spokesperson.

This is an emerging story which needs expansion. If you wish you may EDIT to add information or discuss it in TALK.


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United Kingdom
Linh is a staff journalist at WikiTribune with a background in the humanities. She covers the Middle East, Asia, conflict and technology. Though based in London, she has freelanced across Asia, the UK and U.S.

History for stories "Amazon patents wristband that monitors and directs workers’ hands"

Select two items to compare revisions

05 February 2018

10:38:20, 05 Feb 2018 . .‎ Linh Nguyen (Updated → added statement from amazon)

01 February 2018

12:34:47, 01 Feb 2018 . .‎ Alan Henness (Updated → Tweaked the title to more accurately reflect the content)
12:22:07, 01 Feb 2018 . .‎ Ed Upright (Updated → tweak)
11:49:34, 01 Feb 2018 . .‎ Ed Upright (Updated → image)
11:37:35, 01 Feb 2018 . .‎ Ed Upright (Updated → editing)
11:08:06, 01 Feb 2018 . .‎ Linh Nguyen (Updated → update)
11:07:44, 01 Feb 2018 . .‎ Linh Nguyen (Updated → made a stub)

Talk for Story "Amazon patents wristband that monitors and directs workers’ hands"

Talk about this Story

  1. Other

    One piece of missing information is whether Amazon has made a comment on the band, and if they have, what is it?

    1. Rewrite

      Hello there. I will add a statement it made to technology site The Verge. Thanks.

  2. Other

    Look at the diagram and it has an uncanny resemblance to the clock like machine in the film Metropolis. Where the operator must move the hands to point to lights as and when they switch on.

    That’s a film made in 1927 where they are showing how the world could be today. Looks like they got it right!

    http://torontofilmsociety.org/files/2016/12/Metropolis-3.jpg
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Metropolis_(1927_film)

  3. Rewrite

    I’ve submitted a tweak to the title. Tracking workers isn’t anything new, but the patent is specifically about tracking – and directing – workers’ hands, so I’ve suggested:

    Amazon patents wristband that tracks and directs workers’ hands

    1. Rewrite

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