Russia

’10 days that shook the world’ – the October Revolution, in pictures

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Angela Long

Angela Long

"Thanks Jack - 'Kerensky's' could get..."
Jack Procter-Blain

Jack Procter-Blain

"'The Petrograd assembly of deputies w..."

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On November 7, 1917 (October 25 in the Julian calendar), Russia’s Bolshevik Party overthrew the moderate government, which itself had only been in place since the overthrow of the Tsarist monarchy earlier that year.

The revolution, described by first-hand American observer John Reed as “ten days that shook the world“, ushered in a new government under Vladimir Lenin. This would create a one-party state which maintained control of the Soviet Union until 1990.

The rise of the Bolsheviks was preceded by the February Revolution where protests for food and better pay for soldiers escalated until the monarchy was overthrown. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
The rise of the Bolsheviks was preceded by the February Revolution where protests for food and better pay for soldiers escalated until the monarchy was overthrown. Licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

The Menshevik-led government, which took power after the overthrow of the monarchy, was dogged by protests as people called for an end to the war. This fed support for the more radical Bolsheviks, whose supporters demostrated here in July 1917. Author unknown, licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons
The provisional government, which took power after the overthrow of the monarchy, was dogged by protests as people called for an end to the war. This fed support for the more radical Bolsheviks, whose supporters demostrated here in July 1917. Author unknown, licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

The provisional government reacted to public demonstrations by shooting protestors in July 1917, never truly recovering the support of the people. Author unknown, licenced under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
The provisional government reacted to public demonstrations by shooting protestors in July 1917, never truly recovering the support of the people. Author unknown, licenced under public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

 

The Petrograd assembly of deputies was heavily populated by Bolsheviks, many of whom were key to overthrowing the Menshevik provisional government
The Petrograd Soviet of deputies was heavily populated by Bolsheviks, many of whom were key to overthrowing the Menshevik provisional government. Author unknown, licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

The Bolsheviks were popular with soldiers, who sided with them to take control of Moscow and Petrograd (St Petersburg). Licsnced under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
The Bolsheviks were popular with soldiers, who sided with them to take control of Moscow and Petrograd (St Petersburg). Licenced under public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Public unrest continued after the Bolsheviks took power, here demonstrators call for an end to Russia's involvement in the First World War, in December 1917. Author unknown, licensed under public domain via wikimedia commons
Public unrest continued after the Bolsheviks took power, here demonstrators call for an end to Russia’s involvement in the First World War, in December 1917. Author unknown, licensed under public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

 

December 1917, Vladimir Lenin met the people's demands and ended Russian involvement in the war, signing an armistice with the Central Powers. From the Bundesarchiv via Wikimedia Commons [CC-BY-SA 3.0]
December 1917, Vladimir Lenin met the people’s demands and ended Russia’s involvement in the war, signing an armistice with the Central Powers. From the Bundesarchiv via Wikimedia Commons [CC-BY-SA 3.0]
Vladimir Lenin (left) became leader of the Soviet Union and was ultimately succeeded by Josef Stalin (right). By Maria Ilyinichna Ulyanova, licenced under public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
Vladimir Lenin (left) became leader of the Soviet Union and was ultimately succeeded by Josef Stalin (right). By Maria Ilyinichna Ulyanova, licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

The revolution became memorialised in Soviet propaganda. This was produced for the five year anniversary of October 1917. By Ivan Vasilyevich Simakov [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
The revolution became memorialised in Soviet propaganda. This was produced for the five-year anniversary of October 1917. By Ivan Vasilyevich Simakov licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons
October 1917 depicted in a stamp from 1955. Scanned and processed by A. Sdobnikov (Personal collection) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
October 1917 depicted in a stamp from 1955. Scanned and processed by A. Sdobnikov (Personal collection) licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons

Sources & References

WikiTribune package on Russia to coincide with the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik revolution:


Started by

United Kingdom
Jack Barton is a staff journalist at WikiTribune where he writes about international law, human rights and finance, whilst covering daily news. He was previously a senior reporter at Law Business Research and has experience covering law and international development, with credits in the Sunday Times, the New Indian Express, and New Statesman online among others. He has an LLM in Human Rights and worked on a UN-funded research project, looking at peace processes.

History for stories "’10 days that shook the world’ – the October Revolution, in pictures"

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10 November 2017

15:07:15, 10 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Added package links)

07 November 2017

14:41:48, 07 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Caption inconsistencies)
13:22:34, 07 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Procter-Blain (Updated → Edits)

06 November 2017

15:48:02, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Changed picture titles)
15:36:40, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Changed primary category)
15:33:38, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Burhan Wazir (Updated → Editing)
15:32:07, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Caption consistency)
15:27:43, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Burhan Wazir (Updated → Editing)
15:15:12, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → consistency)
15:12:32, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Added Lenin and Stalin)
15:01:29, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Burhan Wazir (Updated → Editing)
14:47:46, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → revised)
13:02:50, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Standfirst)
13:02:19, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Conflict)
13:01:42, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Pictures added)
12:39:55, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Angela Long (Updated → first-hand hyphenated)
10:43:19, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Angela Long (Updated → copy edits - ten, this would)
10:38:31, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Revision)
10:34:15, 06 Nov 2017 . .‎ Francis Augusto (Updated → edited copy)

04 November 2017

02:45:35, 04 Nov 2017 . .‎ Charles Anderson (Updated → first look)

03 November 2017

18:07:11, 03 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Save)

02 November 2017

19:29:21, 02 Nov 2017 . .‎ Jack Barton (Updated → Created)

Talk for Story "’10 days that shook the world’ – the October Revolution, in pictures"

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  1. Rewrite

    ‘The Petrograd assembly of deputies was heavily populated by Bolsheviks, many of whom were key to overthrowing the Menshevik provisional government’

    Need to provide citation for describing provisional govt. as Menshevik in character. Mensheviks were represented in government composition but not in control of it. Perhaps ‘liberal’ or ‘Kerensky’s’?

    1. Rewrite

      Thanks Jack – ‘Kerensky’s’ could get round the difficulty.

      Angela/WT

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