Briefing: South Korea and Japan to get more advanced weapons from U.S. as North Korea promises ‘more gift packages’

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RS

Robert Samuels

"This is a test as Robert from Nick"
Jack Barton

Jack Barton

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JC

Jonathan Cardy

"Re: to its latest – and largest –..."

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Update

  • Reuter’s reports that the Trump Administration is preparing to announce “revised guidelines” for self-driving cars that would remove federal constraints on this developing technology. As early as tomorrow, the House of Representatives will vote on the Self Drive Act, a bill that would bar states from implementing laws that target autonomous vehicles.
  • President Donald J. Trump has indicated via Twitter that he has ceded to requests from South Korea and Japan to scrap weight limits on the weapons the U.S. can sell to those countries, as the focus of the diplomatic world continues to be trained on the activity of Kim Jong Un’s regime.

  • Officials from Bangladesh and Indonesia have criticised Myanmar President Aung San Suu Kyi for failing to get to grips with the violence that continues to drive the Muslim Rohingya minority from their homes. Reuters reports that Bangladesh, under pressure from the flood of an estimated 125,000 Rohingya refugees, is discussing plans to resettle them on an island in the Bay of Bengal.

Earlier

  • North Korea has said it is ready to send “more gift packages” to the U.S. as the international community reacts to its latest – and largest – weapons test. One of the country’s top diplomats, Han Tae Song, ambassador of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea to the U.N. in Geneva, said the U.S. “will receive more ‘gift packages’ from my country as long as its relies on reckless provocations and futile attempts to put pressure” but did not expand further. Yesterday’s detonation of a hydrogen bomb follows recent demonstrations of inter-continental ballistic missile capability – though there is no indication that North Korea can miniaturise a nuclear weapon to be carried on an intercontinental missile.
  • British police arrested four 22- to 32-year-old men, including serving military members, on suspicion of belonging to banned far right group National Action and plotting terrorist acts. The neo-Nazi group was the very first to be outlawed in Britain last year after the politically-charged murder of British MP Jo Cox by a man thought to be obsessed with white supremacist ideology. In August, a British senior police chief said the number of referrals to the police of suspected right-wing extremism had doubled since Cox’s murder in June last year.

First

  • North Korea determinedly upped the ante in its standoff with the rest of the world: daring China to act against it and calling the bluff of the United States. Extending a series of provocations since testing a new, more powerful warhead, Pyongyang apparently moved an intercontinental ballistic missile towards a coastal location. It’s just the latest in an almost minute-by-minute game of brinksmanship being played out on the Korean Peninsula. South Korea launched naval exercises and said any North Korean attackers would be buried at sea and proposed to increase the scale of American weaponry to deter any North Korean strike. The crisis overshadowed Chinese President Xi Jinping’s meeting of fast-developing countries.
    BBC diplomatic correspondent Jonathan Marcus analysed the diplomatic options for Xi and Trump.
    Financial Times analyst Gideon Rachman said Trump had created dangerous confusion.
  • Nobel Peace Prize winner and Myanmar’s effective leader, Aung San Suu Kyi, faces pressure from Muslim-majority states to condemn the actions of the country’s military — which still runs internal affairs — over its attacks on Muslim Rohingya people in Rakhine state. More than 100,000 people have fled across the border into Bangladesh in the latest flare up of attacks on the Rohingya minority. The UN special rapporteur on human rights in Myanmar said it was up to Suu Kyi to act but she is somewhat confined by the post-military regime constitution which limits her direct power on the issue.

What we’re reading and watching

  • Reuters carries an in-depth piece on the leading Zimbabweans planning for a post-Mugabe world. According to the report, documents from 2009 onwards reveal the plans for potential succession and reforms if ever the 93-year-old gives up power or dies.
  • At least 20 survivors and witnesses of the Grenfell Tower fire tragedy have attempted suicide, according to a BBC report. Support network Silence of Suicide and campaign group Justice4Grenfell said that those working with survivors had heard of 20 suicide attempts since the London fire, however the BBC was not able to verify the figure. In conversation with volunteers in the Grenfell community area, WikiTribune was told by two people about a rise in suicide attempts since the catastrophic event on June 14. (We are currently working on an essay about the Grenfell Tower community.)
  • In a scandal which has thrown light on the dirty tricks deployed by PR firms on behalf of  less than savoury regimes,  notable British public relations company Bell Pottinger was struck off an industry group months after its role in running a vicious and racially divisive secret campaign for the controversial Gupta family in South Africa. Even its founder is now forecasting the end of the once-respected company.
    An analysis in The Economist recently highlighted the risk of PR firms dabbling in dark arts.
  • A major investigation in The Guardian with the Balkan investigative reporting group the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project and Danish newspaper Berlingske exposed a multi-billion dollar lobbying and influence program on behalf of Azerbaijani leaders – with payments to politicians and journalists — to offset its appalling record on corruption and human rights.
  • This is a test edit by robert

 


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United Kingdom
Peter Bale was the Launch Editor of WikiTribune, responsible for delivering on the editorial vision of the founders. He is a former Reuters news agency correspondent and editor and has held roles in news organizations including The Financial Times, The Times, Microsoft and CNN. Most recently he was the Chief Executive Officer of investigative journalism non-profit The Center for Public Integrity which incorporated the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists. He is also the President of the Global Editors Network.

History for stories "Briefing: South Korea and Japan to get more advanced weapons from U.S. as North Korea promises ‘more gift packages’"

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05 February 2018

• (view) . . Comment: What we know about the Nunes FBI memo, its background and implications‎; 13:02:57, 05 Feb 2018 . . Fiona Apps (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Some more background information on FISC procedure with a specific focus on the FISA warrant submissions that were made in during the 2016 election cycle can be found in a FISC Memorandum and Opinion at... https://www.dni.gov/files/documents/icotr/51117/2016_Cert_FISC_Memo_Opin_Order_Apr_2017.pdf It's a bit long but well worth the read. It provides information on a number of FISC/FISA subjects that might be of interest, here is what I found in the first 30 pages; There was more than one FISA warrant (collectively reffered to as the "2016 Certification Submissions") submitted to the FISC during the 2016 election cycle. Each of the 2016 Certifications generally proposes to continue aquisitions of foreign intelligence information that were being conducted under the correspondng certification made in 2015 ("the 2015 Certifications"). There is a particular focus on minimisation procedures and the aquisition, retention and dissemination of nonpublicly available information concerning unconsenting US persons. It references the concept of Multiple Communication Transactions that are captured in the raw collection data that may contain information of or concerning US persons with no foreign intelligence value. There have been previous problems with the NSA's minimisation procedures that were found to be constitutionally deficient by the FISC in 2011. The FISC finding prompted the government to submit amended minimisation procedures that placed significant restrictions on the NSA's retention, use and dissemination of MCTs. It states "of greatest relevance to the present discussion, these procedures categorically prohibited NSA analysts from using known US person identifiers to query the results of upstream Internet collection." It goes on to state "The government has also suggested that NSA may have limited capability, at the time of aquisition, to identify some MCTs as to which the "active user" is a tasked selector. To the extent that NSA is able to do so, such acquisitions would be consistent with FISA and the Fourth Amendment because all discrete communications within this class of MCTs would consist of communications to or from a tasked selector. (finding that proposed NSA procedures, although deficient as applied to other forms of MCTs, were consistent with the statue and the Fourth Amendment as applied to "MCTs as to which the 'active user' is known to be a tasked selector"). That point is significant to current matters: as discussed below, the 2016 Certifications only authorise aquisition of MCTs when the active user is the target of the acquisition. On October 24 2016 the government orally appraised the FISC of significant non-compliance with the NSA's minimisation procedures involving queries of data under Section 702 using US person identifiers. In a notice dated 26 October 2016 the NSA informed the FISC that NSA analysts had been conducting such queries in violation of that prohibition, with much greater frequency than had previously been disclosed to the court. It illustrates that (although not widely publicised at the time) the new Administration and the NSA made significant changes to procedures concerning the collection, handling, use and reporting of information relating to US persons. The changes substantially narrowed the scope of upstream collection, (Most significantly) eliminated "abouts" (a particular method of collection) completely which they say will have the the effect of eliminating aquisition of the more problamatic types of MCTs. It also states; These changes should substantially reduce the acquisition of non-pertinent information concerning US persons persuant to section 702. and; also Revisions to the NSA Minimisation Procedures now state that all Internet transactions aquired on of before that date and existing in NSA's institutionally managed repositories will be sequestered pending destruction such that "NSA personnel will not be able to access them for analytical purposes." )
• (view) . . Comment: What we know about the Nunes FBI memo, its background and implications‎; 13:01:41, 05 Feb 2018 . . Richard Pearce (talk | contribs)‎‎ ( Comment -> Some more background information on FISC procedure with a specific focus on the FISA warrant submissions that were made in during the 2016 election cycle can be found in a FISC Memorandum and Opinion at... https://www.dni.gov/files/documents/icotr/51117/2016_Cert_FISC_Memo_Opin_Order_Apr_2017.pdf It's a bit long but well worth the read. It provides information on a number of FISC/FISA subjects that might be of interest, here is what I found in the first 30 pages; There was more than one FISA warrant (collectively reffered to as the "2016 Certification Submissions") submitted to the FISC during the 2016 election cycle. Each of the 2016 Certifications generally proposes to continue aquisitions of foreign intelligence information that were being conducted under the correspondng certification made in 2015 ("the 2015 Certifications"). There is a particular focus on minimisation procedures and the aquisition, retention and dissemination of nonpublicly available information concerning unconsenting US persons. It references the concept of Multiple Communication Transactions that are captured in the raw collection data that may contain information of or concerning US persons with no foreign intelligence value. There have been previous problems with the NSA's minimisation procedures that were found to be constitutionally deficient by the FISC in 2011. The FISC finding prompted the government to submit amended minimisation procedures that placed significant restrictions on the NSA's retention, use and dissemination of MCTs. It states "of greatest relevance to the present discussion, these procedures categorically prohibited NSA analysts from using known US person identifiers to query the results of upstream Internet collection." It goes on to state "The government has also suggested that NSA may have limited capability, at the time of aquisition, to identify some MCTs as to which the "active user" is a tasked selector. To the extent that NSA is able to do so, such acquisitions would be consistent with FISA and the Fourth Amendment because all discrete communications within this class of MCTs would consist of communications to or from a tasked selector. (finding that proposed NSA procedures, although deficient as applied to other forms of MCTs, were consistent with the statue and the Fourth Amendment as applied to "MCTs as to which the 'active user' is known to be a tasked selector"). That point is significant to current matters: as discussed below, the 2016 Certifications only authorise aquisition of MCTs when the active user is the target of the acquisition. On October 24 2016 the government orally appraised the FISC of significant non-compliance with the NSA's minimisation procedures involving queries of data under Section 702 using US person identifiers. In a notice dated 26 October 2016 the NSA informed the FISC that NSA analysts had been conducting such queries in violation of that prohibition, with much greater frequency than had previously been disclosed to the court. It illustrates that (although not widely publicised at the time) the new Administration and the NSA made significant changes to procedures concerning the collection, handling, use and reporting of information relating to US persons. The changes substantially narrowed the scope of upstream collection, (Most significantly) eliminated "abouts" (a particular method of collection) completely which they say will have the the effect of eliminating aquisition of the more problamatic types of MCTs. It also states; These changes should substantially reduce the acquisition of non-pertinent information concerning US persons persuant to section 702. and; also Revisions to the NSA Minimisation Procedures now state that all Internet transactions aquired on of before that date and existing in NSA's institutionally managed repositories will be sequestered pending destruction such that "NSA personnel will not be able to access them for analytical purposes." )

12 January 2018

29 November 2017

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    Re: to its latest – and largest – nuclear test of a hydrogen bomb for intercontinental ballistic missiles.

    Firstly this is their first claimed Hydrogen bomb – a significant escalation in size from previous atomic bombs, but their first hydrogen bomb not their latest. Secondly we don’t know if they have successfully miniaturised these bombs to the point where they can be delivered by their missiles.

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