Title Title
Actor Hugh Grant at the premiere event for the The Pirates! Band of Misfits in Sydney, Australia, in April 2012. Photo by Eva Rinaldi Actor Hugh Grant wins British tabloid hacking case
Summary Summary
  The legal and political controversy over phone hacking by British tabloid newspapers reignited with a court victory for Hugh Grant
Highlights Highlights
Content Content
Actor Hugh Grant at the premiere event for the The Pirates! Band of Misfits in Sydney, Australia, in April 2012. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Hugh_Grant,_2012.jpg <i><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is an emerging story which needs expansion if you wish to EDIT to add information or discuss it in TALK.</span></i>
  <strong>Actor Hugh Grant, who has waged a long and public battle to confront intrusive and sometimes illegal tactics by the British tabloid press, <a href="https://www.theguardian.com/media/2018/feb/05/hugh-grant-wins-damages-from-mirror-phone-hacking-case">won a fresh court victory</a> <em>(Guardian) </em>against a second major newspaper group which he accused of "illegal activities carried out on an institutionalized basis."</strong>
  In a UK High Court settlement on Monday, the publisher of the <em><a href="https://www.mirror.co.uk/">Daily Mirror</a></em> – a once thriving left-leaning tabloid – admitted illegal hacking by several of its titles and paid a financial settlement to Grant. He said it would be donated to the campaigning group <a href="http://hackinginquiry.org/">Hacked Off</a>.
  In a <a href="http://hackinginquiry.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Hugh-Grant-v-MGN.pdf">section of the judgment</a> against Mirror Group Newspapers, the company acknowledges senior staff "condoned, encouraged or actively turned a blind eye to the widespread culture of unlawful information gathering activities." It goes on that "repeated and prolonged intrusions into innocent people's lives" could have been halted had it investigated the claims when they first emerged in 2006.
  It is the latest settlement in a multi-year chain of legal campaigns against leading British publishers accused of using private detectives and illicit methods to intercept the voicemail messages of celebrities, victims of crime, and others. The campaign, led in part by Grant and former world motorsport federation boss <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Max_Mosley">Max Mosley</a>, has led to court settlements, the closure of Rupert Murdoch's <em><a href="http://www.newsoftheworld.co.uk/">News of the World</a></em> paper, and a <a href="https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leveson_Inquiry">public inquiry into media law</a> which has led to a new regulatory regime for British newspaper publishers.
  <i><span style="font-weight: 400;">This is an emerging story which needs expansion if you wish to EDIT to add information or discuss it in TALK.</span></i>
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Categories Categories
  Crime, Current Affairs, Media, United Kingdom, Media
Article type Article type
  emerging
Tags Tags
  Hugh Grant, Max Mosley, Mirror, News of the World, Rupert Murdoch
Author byline Author byline
No No
Has hero Has hero
No No
Hero Alignment Hero Alignment
  No
Hero Image URL Hero Image URL
None None
Featured Image URL Featured Image URL
  https://s3-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/wikitribune-uploads-master/2018/02/Hugh_Grant_2012.jpg
Sources Sources

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