Questions on Japan and a push for a nuclear-free future


According to a 2016 poll conducted five years after the nuclear disaster in Fukushima, 57 percent of Japanese citizens support shutting down all nuclear power plants (DW). This has not stopped Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, the longest-serving prime minister since World War II, from trying to reopen over 20 nuclear power plants (The Conversation). 

A new political party in Japan has made its opposition to nuclear energy a central component of its platform. The Constitutional Democratic Party was founded less than one year ago and, after elections in 2017, has established itself as the largest opposition party in the country in part because it has pledged to shut down all nuclear power plants if elected into a majority position.

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WikiTribune will investigate the political debate over a nuclear-free Japan, and whether the Constitutional Democratic Party has a chance of achieving its aims.

Questions to answer

  1. Does Japan have space to expand its solar and wind farms?
  2. Who owns Japan’s power plants, and is there any connection with political leaders?
  3. Do older Japanese citizens who grew up in the shadow of World War II oppose nuclear power more than young Japanese voters?
  4. Who are the leaders of the Constitutional Democratic Party? Where did they come from, and how did they formulate their anti-nuclear platform?
  5. Has the breakup of the Japan’s energy monopoly in 2016 had any affect in reforming the country’s energy sector?

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