Talk for Article "Reputation management by countries with difficult records"

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    The advertising is in a way amusing after decades of unprofessional PR of Saudi, thus creating the worst image country. Still not very professional imho, but at least a start…

    In regard to other sovereign states, there are a number of interesting/concerning cases, e.g. https://www.ft.com/content/1411b1a0-a310-11e7-9e4f-7f5e6a7c98a2 or the story of Kuwait during occupation.

  2. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

    Related issue, perhaps. Saudi Princess Reema appeared on Channel 4 news ‘We are seeing cultural norms change’
    https://www.channel4.com/news/saudi-princess-reema-we-are-seeing-cultural-norms-change

    I found the timing somewhat convenient for all concerned.

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      It is related but not insidious since it was international women’s day and she was here with him and it is a fascinating and risky shift. No?

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    Hold on! The KSA paid for all those billboards with its own money. If there is anybody to criticise, it is the owners of the billboards.
    Don’t spray accusations without evidence.

    Peter Howard

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      One of the reasons we are looking at this is that some of the advertising was supported by the UK department of trade. That may be perfectly legitimate of course given that Saudi Arabia is a significant trading partner. Even if that is particularly for one of the strongest British manufacturing exports: arms.

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    This is what it is called in the industry and it is used as a quote. Some countries have challenging reputations which they seek to modify with lobbying and public relations activity. For example: https://www.publicintegrity.org/2016/07/14/19930/rape-murder-famine-and-21-million-k-street-pr

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      This source you have provided supports the use of the term “reputation management”.

      The expression “reputation laundering” is, as far as I can tell, a UK-specific and highly pejorative term used to describe the practice of PR companies representing authoritarian governments. It doesn’t appear to be a term used in the industry as a matter of routine work – the neutral term would be “reputation management”.

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      And to go a bit further….
      https://www.theguardian.com/media/2017/sep/05/reputation-laundering-is-lucrative-business-for-london-pr-firms

      This story mentions unethical PR practices that go beyond just representing autocratic governments… things like “propaganda videos and fake Wikipedia entries”.

      My point is that the term is inherently pejorative.

      (To be clear, I’m a frequent critic personally of such practices and deplore them. But that’s a different matter from wanting to avoid, especially in requests for participation in a story, setting an angle from the outset that suggests something that, ideally, is only the result of evidentiary journalism rather than being the angle aimed at by our own preferences.)

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    1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

      There having been no counter-arguments I have changed the title in line with this discussion.

  6. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

    I recommend a more neutral title – in examining the activities around the visit of the Crown Prince of Saudi Arabia, the headline should not assume the conclusion – particularly in a wikiproject. A callout for help in writing a story about “reputation laundering” invites only evidence in support of that thesis. We must remain neutral.

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      I think it is clear now. It is also not specific to this visit and perhaps shouldn’t have been though it was particularly noticeable this time.
      There is an established phenomenon with which worth addressing when the advertising in this case has been so prominent and the visit of a Saudi “change agent” so prominent, that warrants being addressed. It is specific to countries which believe they need to counter bad publicity or historic bad reputations. But I think it is clear now.

      1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

        Yes. The correct neutral term for this is reputation management. I have changed the title accordingly.

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