'10 days that shook the world' - the October Revolution, in pictures


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On November 7, 1917 (October 25 in the Julian calendar), Russia’s Bolshevik Party overthrew the moderate government, which itself had only been in place since the overthrow of the Tsarist monarchy earlier that year.

The revolution, described by first-hand American observer John Reed as “ten days that shook the world“, ushered in a new government under Vladimir Lenin. This would create a one-party state which maintained control of the Soviet Union until 1990.

The rise of the Bolsheviks was preceded by the February Revolution where protests for food and better pay for soldiers escalated until the monarchy was overthrown. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
The rise of the Bolsheviks was preceded by the February Revolution where protests for food and better pay for soldiers escalated until the monarchy was overthrown. Licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

The Menshevik-led government, which took power after the overthrow of the monarchy, was dogged by protests as people called for an end to the war. This fed support for the more radical Bolsheviks, whose supporters demostrated here in July 1917. Author unknown, licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons
The provisional government, which took power after the overthrow of the monarchy, was dogged by protests as people called for an end to the war. This fed support for the more radical Bolsheviks, whose supporters demostrated here in July 1917. Author unknown, licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

The provisional government reacted to public demonstrations by shooting protestors in July 1917, never truly recovering the support of the people. Author unknown, licenced under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
The provisional government reacted to public demonstrations by shooting protestors in July 1917, never truly recovering the support of the people. Author unknown, licenced under public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

 

The Petrograd assembly of deputies was heavily populated by Bolsheviks, many of whom were key to overthrowing the Menshevik provisional government
The Petrograd Soviet of deputies was heavily populated by Bolsheviks, many of whom were key to overthrowing the Menshevik provisional government. Author unknown, licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

The Bolsheviks were popular with soldiers, who sided with them to take control of Moscow and Petrograd (St Petersburg). Licsnced under Public Domain via Wikimedia Commons
The Bolsheviks were popular with soldiers, who sided with them to take control of Moscow and Petrograd (St Petersburg). Licenced under public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

 

Public unrest continued after the Bolsheviks took power, here demonstrators call for an end to Russia's involvement in the First World War, in December 1917. Author unknown, licensed under public domain via wikimedia commons
Public unrest continued after the Bolsheviks took power, here demonstrators call for an end to Russia’s involvement in the First World War, in December 1917. Author unknown, licensed under public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

 

December 1917, Vladimir Lenin met the people's demands and ended Russian involvement in the war, signing an armistice with the Central Powers. From the Bundesarchiv via Wikimedia Commons [CC-BY-SA 3.0]
December 1917, Vladimir Lenin met the people’s demands and ended Russia’s involvement in the war, signing an armistice with the Central Powers. From the Bundesarchiv via Wikimedia Commons [CC-BY-SA 3.0]
Vladimir Lenin (left) became leader of the Soviet Union and was ultimately succeeded by Josef Stalin (right). By Maria Ilyinichna Ulyanova, licenced under public domain, via Wikimedia Commons
Vladimir Lenin (left) became leader of the Soviet Union and was ultimately succeeded by Josef Stalin (right). By Maria Ilyinichna Ulyanova, licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons

 

The revolution became memorialised in Soviet propaganda. This was produced for the five year anniversary of October 1917. By Ivan Vasilyevich Simakov [Public domain or Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
The revolution became memorialised in Soviet propaganda. This was produced for the five-year anniversary of October 1917. By Ivan Vasilyevich Simakov licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons
October 1917 depicted in a stamp from 1955. Scanned and processed by A. Sdobnikov (Personal collection) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons
October 1917 depicted in a stamp from 1955. Scanned and processed by A. Sdobnikov (Personal collection) licenced under public domain via Wikimedia Commons
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