Talk for Article "Explainer: The big questions behind the Spanish crisis over Catalonia"

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  1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

    Thank you Andrew, for that thoughtful contribution. We have to consider re-writing a more comprehensive article, especially in the light of ongoing events. But could I ask you if you think there is a role for a short, almost bullet-point type explainer of complex situations on WT? We do want access to be universal. For example, a Cuba sanctions story might just have one line about Fidel Castro, if you see what I mean.

    Angela

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      Thank you for your answer Angela. I think there should be space for short, almost bullet-point explainers of complex situations. It is important to give an overall approach for those readers who are not acquainted with those particular story lines. I think the article you wrote did provide a good introduction to what is happening in Spain. Once this is done, and the attention of the reader has been caught, more comprehensive articles should ensue (in my opinion). I would love to help you write or edit one on this topic. I actually wrote a paper for my master´s degree in Political Science on the rise of Catalan independentism. Let me know if I can be of any help!

      1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

        Great, Andrew. I’ll discuss the collaborative form with our editor and we can take it from there.

        Angela

        1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

          That sounds great Angela. Many thanks!

          1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

            Andrew – if still interested in writing a piece to help people understand the various pro-independence parties and their stance?
            Herewith an outline for you to consider …
            I will edit and suggest anything which might be relevant. If you haven’t seen Pete Young’s guide to writing an article for WikiTribune, I recommend it. There’s a link on the front page.

            The structure would be like this:
            • Intro par: ‘Catalonia has played large in international news since the start of October, when a referendum poll on independence was held. That set in motion a chain of events which culminated in the central Spanish government in Madrid calling elections in Catalonia for December 21.’
            • Who will contest these elections? We look at the political groupings calling for independence. EG Carles Puigdemont’s party belongs to Junts per Si …
            • Explain, briefly, each of the significant political parties. Don’t go into the history too much at this stage.
            • A few paragraphs on when Catalan independence became more than an aspiration or a cultural urge but an organised political force.
            • Which parties look like they will remain, and which might fracture under the strain

            I think 1200 is a good length to aim for initially. There will no doubt be suggestions for inclusion from the community.

            1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

              Hi Angela,

              This sounds great. I will start working on it right away. Many thanks for the opportunity.

            2. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

              Hi Angela, I have a first draft. Would you like me to send it to you? Where should I send it to?

              1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

                Andrew, can you start the story in WordPress and mark it Private? Or you can send a doc to [email protected]

                1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

                  Hi Angela,

                  I will send you the text to your email and if that is ok we can work from there!

  2. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

    Hi Angela,

    I think your article does mention some of the contextual problems that have triggered the current standoff. However, there are a number of other issues that have been left out. Up until 2006, Catalonia had approximately a 25% of the population who supported independence, with the rest of the population divided between people who sought to get more autonomy, federalists, people who were happy with the level of autonomy it had until then and a small percentage of people who wanted more centralized power for the Spanish state. In 2005, the Socialist Government in Madrid and the Government of the Generalitat negotiated a new autonomy framework “l´estatut” which was then backed by around 60% of the electorate. However, the Popular Party (the one in power in Madrid now) decided to appeal it and take it to the Spanish Constitutional Court, which gutted some of its most important articles. It was then when a great number of Catalan people realized that there was no space for further self-government in the Spanish State and that independence was the only path forward.

    Also, there is a great sense in Catalonia (an among other people in the rest of Spain) that a number of institutions that are meant to serve everybody´s interests are deeply controlled by the main political parties and the factual powers. Corruption scandals like Gúrtel, which allegedly affects the Popular Party and even the prime minister Mariano Rajoy, have undermined the credibility of the central government and the judicial power. Therefore, many Catalan people think that a new State is necessary.

  3. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

    Can I suggest an addition?

    There is a very useful context missing re: Puigdemont. He was a compromise candidate after the last election (with CUP refusing to support Artur Mas) – and he is really an ‘accidental’ president.

    1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

      Thanks Sam, it is worth a reference … I didn’t want go too far down that road, for as I’m sure you know the pro-independence political parties story is a complicated web. But I’ll insert a line and hope it doesn’t raise too many questions for the readers who are new to the scene.

      Angela

      1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

        Thanks Angela – I think it’s a core part of his context. He hasn’t been the leader of this movement from the beginning – he has essentially been thrust into this position by circumstance.

        But I here you, it’s a complex story.

  4. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

    The highlights hardly reflect the content of the article. “So long Barcelona” doesn’t make much sense, plus the article doesn’t say much about the “economic and international fallout anticipated”. And as for the Basque precedents, well… This is unlike anything the Basque Country has done previously. It definitely deserves a mention in the story, but it would not be one of my choices for highlights.

    1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

      You are right about the highlight ‘So long Barcelona’, which has been changed. Other revisions have been incorporated. This is a short article so not all angles or extended explanations can be included, but as always do feel free to write your own article and submit. For example, section 155 is brief and not specific, but nevertheless it is the one which has been applied.

      Angela

  5. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

    >This followed a referendum on the issue on October 1
    A “so called referendum”, deemed illegal by the Constitutional Tribunal. The only referendum deemed appropriate according to the Spanish constitution is one involving the whole Spanish population, not a particular region.

    1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

      One issue is current legality and another is its practical implementation. Who decides to submit the constitution or not is the government and the constitutional court.

      The different autonomous communities of the country should have some type of legal recourse to be able to decide their internal affairs. This has never been done in Spain.

      Matters relating to a territory should be decided first by its citizens. Other territories should not have preference over that decision.

      1. [ This comment is from a user you have muted ] (show)

        Please note I flagged my previous comment under “Suggest rewrite”. I am in no way talking about what should or should not be, but merely stating what is. I, as you do, have my own personal opinions regarding this matter, but those should be kept to a different _Talk_ subsection.

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